Jump to content

Bigmoran

Member Since 28 Apr 2012
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 11:27 PM
****-

Topics I've Started

[US+EU] Best of Each Class

15 June 2015 - 08:33 PM

Who do you guys think are the best players currently? Please keep your lists US only or EU only, no mix and matching please.

Deathknight:

Druid:
Boomkin -
Resto -
Feral -

Hunter:

Mage:

Monk:
Windwalkerr -
Mistweaver -

Rogue:

Shaman:
Resto -
Enhancement -
Elemental -

Paladin:
Retribution -
Holy -

Priest:
Disc -
Shadow -

Warrior:

Warlock:

WoD's Design Paradigm and the Warcraft Experience

06 June 2015 - 07:07 AM

Post on official forums: http://us.battle.net...c/18000131343#1 Please support this post if possible.

I haven't been keeping up with the forums recently, but it has been quite clear to me that there is a growing sentiment that WoW is less fun than it used to be. As someone who has played WoW for over eight years, this is something I have also felt as of late. I want to be very clear that I really like World of Warcraft. I have had someone of my fondest experiences and met some of my closest friends on this game. That being said, I am very concerned for the future of WoW. I certainly do not want to see the game I've loved for eight years die in a single expansion. The aim of this post is to try and illuminate what I think are the core problems of World of Warcraft's current design paradigm. By no means are any of these problems original ideas. I'm sure there are plenty of posts that have shared my exact feelings. My hope is that others may share some of these feelings and create conversations with both the developers and the community itself.

I. The lack of 'world' in World of Warcraft

Garrisons were originally an interesting novel addition to the WoW experience. They served the purpose of delivering an individual single player experience. While the intention of adding Garrisons might have been to allow for a more personal solo gameplay, I think the psychological effects of Garrisons have been quite damaging on the community. For one, they removed the need for many laborious activities to be done across Azeroth. Everything from gold farming to transmorgification can be done within the Garrison. While this may seem very convenient, it is also incredibly isolating. It is possible to be entirely self sustainable while never needing to leave your Garrison. A friend of mine has even leveled a character 90-100 by simply completing Garrison missions every day.

Smaller server sub-communities are often created in zones with lots of interaction. Durotar and Elwynn Forest are places where people would meet up with each other. They could duel, chit-chat, banter, gossip, etc. While these zones still exist, it is much more common to see many people on your friends list just sitting in their Garrison. It is the equivalent of locking yourself in your room while there is a wonderful party going on in your house. Stormshield and Warspear don't really feel like main cities. Instead there are just a waypoint between you and your Garrison.

II. Trivialized Rewards

I think this problem has its roots with the introduction of Justice Point gear during the Zul'Aman patch in BC. Rewards are given to players for completing the most trivial of tasks. Queue a BG? Get a reward. Complete a dungeon? Get a reward. Complete a garrison mission? Get a reward. Items and achievements are given for almost everything you do in WoW. These trivial tasks also trivialize the reward you receive.  I recently graduated from university. Even though my diploma is a fancy piece of paper, it symbolizes four years of work.  Imagine if all it took to receive a college diploma was to complete a ten question survey. Surely it would devalue the worth of the diploma itself. While it does make gearing characters a much faster process, spamming players with rewards is also something that I see as damaging. Giving players meaningful challenges is something that motivates them to play.

The trivializing of rewards is something that has also effected PvP. The prestige of PvP titles has been lost since the removal of Battlegroups. Rank one titles had more meaning when they were only given to a single team (barring the Season 8 fiasco and other ties throughout the arena seasons). Rank one titles seem to be passed out like hotcakes. Once again, this devalues the worth of the achievement and trivializes the effort involved in obtaining it.

III. Scripted PvP

I really appreciate the effort of Blizzard in barring bots from the game. That being said, I think these efforts were made too late and there is definitely more work to be done. Nonetheless, even if there is not a single bot in WoW, PvP seems to be rather scripted. What I mean by this is that every class and composition has its own script that determines the most optimal plays in a particular matchup. The better each player is at performing their script determines the outcome of the matchup. Mages are a class that I think characterize scripted gameplay. Every 30 seconds, Mages will use Blazing Speed, Blink, Deepfreeze, and Polymorph/Ring of Frost. It's a rinse and repeat algorithm.

The scripted feeling of PvP distorts the depth that each class is capable of achieving. Each class and composition is streamlined into playing a certain way. If you do not play by the script, you will fail. If you play by the script, you will succeed.

IV. Cooldowns being too strong or too weak

One of the biggest changes to class design since Vanilla was the increasing number of cooldowns with every expansion. While I do think cooldowns are interesting, there is an incredible imbalance of the strength of different cooldowns and their interactions with other abilities. Simply put, some cooldowns are disproportionately strong compared to others. One example of crazy powerful cooldown/ability interaction that is Bestial Wrath, Focus Fire, A Murder of Crows, and Barrage. These four abilities (all of which are cooldowns) dramatically increase the damage done by the BM hunter. The only class that can completely counter this combination of abilities is Rogue (they can Vanish to remove crows and Stun/Gouge/Blind to interrupt Barrage). Some offensive and defensive cooldowns are incredibly powerful, so much so that matchups revolve around the usage of these cooldowns and how well the other team answers with their own cooldowns. It's another form of the script. The most optimal reply to cooldown usage is often more cooldown usage. This cooldown matching doesn't really seem to add much to the depth of matchups. To me, games are infinitely more exciting when they are not determined by a single ability, but instead the consistent good use of an entire skill set.

V. Passive abilities

Controlling your character involves conscious use of movement keys and abilities. Casting a Chaos Bolt, running around with Sprint, and shifting into Bear Form all involve a physical interaction with you and your peripherals. Moving around and casting spells gives you a sense of robust autonomy and allows you to connect with your character. Another change in class design over the years has been the introduction of many passive abilities and perks. While these may benefit each individual class and spec, they really seem to distort this feeling of "I did that" when it comes to controlling your character. In PvP, one of the most complained about passive abilities is Saved by the Light. This ability, like other passives, does not require the user to perform anything (sure you can make the argument that it requires Beacon of Light on the target but that is beside the point). This trivializes the value of the ability itself. If a matchup is determined by a passive Seal of the Light proc, it is psychologically damaging to both the winning and losing team. The Paladin feels like they haven't really done anything-- their win cannot be attributed to the conscious and careful use of a spell. The team that loses is frustrated, knowing that the enemy team has won the matchup because the game had registered a target at x% HP and prevented the death of that target.  

Conclusion (TL;DR)

Much of the current design paradigm in WoW has had psychological damage on players, dampening their motivation to play the game. Overall the game feels less immersive, provides too many rewards, reinforces homogenized gameplay strategies, and revolves too much around powerful cooldowns and passive abilities. The game seems to be losing much of its spirit. Having a fun time in WoW involves joining a community, being creative with your spells, and having a sense of achievement.

[Bigmoran Videos] Some recent vids :^)

05 June 2015 - 08:45 PM

Haven't posted here in ages.




Blizz opens exchange between gold and real life currencies

02 March 2015 - 06:11 PM

http://us.battle.net...-token-3-2-2015

Grats to Team ABN of USA, winners of Gamers League Battle of the Atlantic!

16 February 2015 - 12:46 AM

4-1 to ABN.

The Atlantic is ours.

Posted Image

<