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How to: Download and Convert Twitch.tv VoD's for Vegas

Vegas twitch vod

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#1 Zub

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 10:42 AM

So the original thread I made I was just asking what people use to convert .spx to .mp3 for use in Vegas and then I ended up deleting my topic or something (hopefully this doesn't end up double posting) and figuring it out myself. Ultimately I made a guide for the process I've been doing to accomplish this from start to finish so that you can get everything into Vegas. If anyone has an easier process for doing this, feel free to contribute or correct my little walk through. Just sharing what works for me, I haven't noticed any quality loss and this is what seems to work well with my lower-end laptop.

Downloading the VoD

The best way to download your VODs right now is through this website. You can use firefox extensions like DownloadHelper, which allow you to download flash elements on webpages, but it tends to have complications with streams that are over a certain time limit (they get split into multiple files).

Extracting the .flv

Now that you have the .flv downloaded you can most likely play it in a player like VLC already, but there will most likely be issues with the audio as most twitch recordings use .spx and it doesn't seem to play well with VLC/Vegas. I use a small tool called FLV Extract. It's really easy to use - after you extract the zip, open up FLVExtract.exe and you'll see a window like this:

1) Open up FLVExtract.exe:

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2) Click the .flv file you downloaded and drag it onto the above window.

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Something like should appear now. If it seems like it isn't doing anything at first, don't freak out - it might just take a few minutes depending on how big the file is. I just downloaded a VoD that was 2 hours long (about 1 GB in file size) and it took my laptop a couple minutes to take care of it.

True Frame Rate: You might want to take note of this number for the next step (which may be optional).

Converting these newly extracted files

You should have a few new files available in the same directory as your .flv - .264 is your video file, .spx is your audio file. You may be able to just import the .264 file into Vegas, but I haven't had much success with this - for me it's resulted in VERY SLOW wait times and Vegas freezing up but it could be a result of me using a pretty crappy laptop. If you have this problem, see next:

Putting the video into an .mp4 container

I've had a lot less trouble with the video file when I convert it to an .mp4. The slow loading times and freezing that I had occuring with the raw .264 file seem to be gone completely after I did this, so you might give it a shot if you are having problems also. For this step I use a program called Yamb (Yet Another Mp4Box UI), which is also freeware, and it's relatively simple.

1) Double click this first available option (create an mp4 file)

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2) Click the "Add" button on the right side and browse to your .264 file

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3) Select the .264 file in the list and click "Properties"

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This is where you want to input your True Frame Rate from before. Typically this is going to be ~25. Adding a random higher number isn't going to improve your quality or anything, it's just going to make it seem sped up when you go to edit it.

4) Click Next and let it do magic.

Converting .spx to .mp3

In my experience Vegas really doesn't like .spx audio format for some reason. I tried a bunch of different trial programs that ended up expiring after a few days or had crappy limitations like only letting you use a portion of the source. I ended up finding out you can just use VLC media player (all around amazing player compared to Windows media player that most people have anyways) to convert the file pretty easily, but it was a little slow for me.

The reason I don't add the audio stream to the mp4 container we just made is because often times I find the audio gets slightly out of sync, such as when your stream has a short hiccup, and thereafter everything from that point would be skewed. I find it's just easier to add the audio stream separately from the video and adjust the timing as needed.

1) Open VLC Media Player and press CTRL+R or go to File > Convert / Save.

2) Go to "Add" and find your .spx file, then at the bottom click the dropdown arrow and go to "Convert" or press ALT-C.

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3) Click "Browse" next to Destination file, browse to whatever folder you've been working in and name it whatever you want .mp3. Change the profile being used to Audio - MP3.

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Everything should be good to go now, just click Start and let it work. It should have a progress bar going across the screen as it normally would if it were playing back a song or a movie, but I haven't gotten an estimated time function to work yet.

Import your files into Vegas

File > Import > Media - find your new .mp4 and .mp3 files and they should be completely compatible for editing now.

Edited by Zub, 28 March 2013 - 06:46 PM.


#2 TteSPORTSDoomsen

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:11 AM

Looks like a good guide, thanks.

#3 Starcookie

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:22 AM

Sounds good, thanks!

#4 flay117

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 01:47 PM

useful information, thx & good job! :)





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